alt.support.diabetes

the official website for the newsgroup

Welcome to Alt-Support-Diabetes

Alt-Support-Diabetes (ASD) is an online support group for diabetics, their families and friends. We use this forum to freely share our personal experiences, knowledge, hopes, successes and frustrations concerning diabetes and it's impact on our lives. Currently we are using three major forums: the newsgroup alt.support.diabetes, our IRC chat room, and this website.

Newsgroups are one of the oldest parts of the internet called UseNet. It even pre-dates the World Wide Web. Currently there are over 70,000 individual newsgroups.

We encourage everyone to first read the newsgroups FAQ. It explains the few do's and don'ts and some basic information about posting to a UseNet forum such as ours.

Diabetes in the News

  • Technophobia may keep seniors from using apps to manage diabetes
    Despite showing interest in web or mobile apps to help manage their type 2 diabetes, only a small number of older adults actually use them, says a new study. Approximately 2.2 million Canadians are living with type 2 diabetes, 2 million of whom are age 50 or older. A study found that although more than 90 per cent of research participants owned a computer or had daily Internet access, just 18 per cent used applications on this technology to help manage their diabetes. While almost half owned smartphones, only 5 per cent used them to manage their disease.
  • People with blood groups A, B and AB at higher risk of type 2 diabetes than group O
    A study of more than 80,000 women has uncovered different risks of developing type 2 diabetes associated with different blood groups, with the biggest difference a 35 percent increased risk of type 2 diabetes found in those with group B, Rhesus factor positive blood compared with the universal donor group O, Rhesus factor negative.
  • Urban stressors may contribute to rising rate of diabetes in developing nations
    As people in developing nations relocate from rural areas to cities, the increased stress is affecting their hormone levels and making them more susceptible to diabetes and other metabolic disorders, according to a new study.